Sir John de Gresley

Sir John de Gresley is part of an Alternate Line, go to Romanus de Helton to view the more accurate Hilton/Hylton/Helton line.

Child of Sir John de Gresley

Edward Hilton

b. bef 05 Jun 1595/96, d. October 1670
Edward Hilton|b. bef 05 Jun 1595/96\nd. Oct 1670|p25.htm#i242|Captain Roger Hilton|b. bt 1550 - 1560\nd. 1604/5|p18.htm#i179|Ellen Mainwarring|b. 1552\nd. 27 Mar 1606|p141.htm#i1403|William Hilton of Biddick|b. b 1511\nd. 1562|p18.htm#i180|Margaret Metcalfe|b. c 1515\nd. a 4 Jun 1566|p19.htm#i190|John Mainwarring||p141.htm#i1404||||

16th great-grandson of William I King of England.
14th great-grandson of Romanus de Helton.
13th great-grandson of Eleanor of Aquitaine Queen of England.
Brother of William Hilton.
9th great-granduncle of Kerry Suzanne Davis.
Edward Hilton was born bef 05 Jun 1595/96 in Biddick, Durham, England. This may not be this Edward's birthdate since there's the question of whether this is Edward Hilton from Northwich, son of William Hilton, or Edward, son of Captain Roger Hilton, of Biddick, Durham. The Great Migration Begins gives the Bapitism date of 5 June 1596 for Edward, son of William Hilton, at Witton Chapel, Northwich, Cheshire.

Hind states "William Hylton the pilgrim was born at North Biddick Hall" and for now I'll assume that if this Edward was William's brother, then he was most likely born there as well. NEHGS states Edward was born in Northwich, Chester, England but this could possibly stem from a mistake made in the early 20th century, mentioned by Eric Lamberton below, and the assumption that Edward and William were brothers from Northwich and not checking records in Durham where there were also Hilton brothers, Edward and William.1,2 He was the son of Captain Roger Hilton and Ellen Mainwarring.

Edward Hilton died between October 1670 and 6 March 1670/1 in Dover, Strafford County, New Hampshire.3

The New England Historical & Genealogical Society notes (showing no sources) that William Hilton was the father of William and Edward Hilton. Other databases, including information from Eric Wil Lamberton, state that Captain Roger Hilton, brother of William Hilton, was actually their father. According to Mr. Lamberton, "Basically no research was carried out in the county of Durham, and assumptions were made that William and Edward were a William and Edward of Northwich. The problem lies in the fact that the parish records for Monkwearmouth for that period were burnt in a fire. The only written evidence is in a book called "The History and Folklore of Old Washington" by Albert Hind who was an antiquarian who lived on the River Wear, and he states William and Edward [who came on the Fortune in 1621] were born at Biddick Old Hall, a few miles from Hylton Castle. All the circumstantial evidence would confirm this." Lamberton goes on to say "I believe the William and Edward [from] Northwich were related, probably descendants of a marriage between Richard Hilton (uncle of this William and his brother Edward) and a daughter of Middleton.....he [Richard] is thought to be the father of Hugh Hilton who arrived at Jamestown in 1619."

Around what was probably the turn of the 16th/17th century, decades before the Mayflower sailed for Plymouth, the Hylton family appears to have had quite a large and successful fishing fleet, fishing in the north sea and off New Foundland. Eric Lamberton says that "both William and Edward Hilton were north sea fishermen operating out of both Monkwearmouth (where the fishing grounds are) and London. (An added note, and interesting tidbit about Monkwearmouth that I just read recently was that it is considered to be the birthplace of stained glass.) William and Edward are believed to have been amongst the first English fishermen fishing off Newfoundland in the early part of the 17th century. The Hyltons had a monopoly on salt production in Elizabethan England; salt was needed to preserve the catch on its voyage back to England where it was sold at the Billingsgate fish market. Edward was a member of the Fisherman's Guild of London."4,5

As a member of the Fishmongers Company he would have had a basic general education during his apprenticeship [Pillsbury Anc]. His inventory included "the 3 Books of the Martyrs" valued at £2 10s. and "one great Bible & five other books" valued at £2 6s.6

William and Edward Hilton came to Plymouth aboard the "Fortune" in 1621, the year after the "Mayflower" arrived in America. The "Fortune," a small ship carrying only 35 passengers, left England in July 1621 and didn't arrive at Plymouth until November 10th of that year. On arrival they found that half the "Mayflower" passengers had not made it through their first winter in Plymouth and had died. The "Fortune" sailed back to England carrying a "cargo of good clapboard as full as she could stow, and two hogsheads of beaver and other skins" which showed the great potential for settling in America, and the hopes of selling this cargo and ensuring future settlement at Plymouth. Unfortunately, before reaching port in England, the ship was stopped by the French who seized the cargo and that intended profit for the small colony back in Plymouth was lost.7,8,9

Edward Hiltonis shown in NEHGS records to have migrated to America in 1628, although we have seen that he was listed as a passenger on the Fortune which arrived in 1621. I would assume that Edward did some traveling back and forth to England.

NEHGS records first show Edward in the area of Hilton's Point and the River Pascataquak, and what later became known as Dover, New Hampshire, the town of which he and his brother William are considered to be the founders. In the History of Dover, New Hampshire, Edward is called the "Father of the Settlement of New Hampshire."2,10

Circa 1929 Edward Hilton is thought to have married. Edward has been shown to have returned to England in 1629 and a supposition on my part is that perhaps it was to marry this first (or maybe only) wife and then bring her back to New England. This wife is said to have died circa 1642 in Exeter, Rockingham County, New Hampshire.11

Although Edward returned to England in 1629, by March 1629/30 he was seen to be back in New England where on 12 March 1629/30 the Council for New England issued to him a patent (known as the "Squamscott Patent") for "all that part of the River Pascataquack known by the name of Wecanacohunt or Hilton's Point with the south side of of the said River, up to the fall of the River, and three miles into the mainland by all the breadth aforesaid." Hilton sold this land to "some merchants of Bristol," who in turn sold it to a number of the leading Puritan gentry of England.12,13,14

On 4 December 1639 the Exeter First Book of Records states that "Mr. Edward Hilton, his upland grounds is bounded in breadth from the creek next from his house towards Exeter on the one side, and a certain point of land over against Captain Wiggins his house between the marsh and the upland that's his bounds on the other side and it is to extend into the main by the same distance in length as it is in breadth, and that he shall have all the meadows which he found unoccupied from his house to the mouth of Lamprel River."15

Edward held various offices between 1642 and 1664, as a Magistrate in the Piscataqua Court, 20 May 1642, 25 June 1661, 7 August 1661, 30 June 1663, 2 February 1663/4, 28 June 1664 [ MBCR; NHPP]; as an Arbiter, July 1642 NHPP]; and on the Committee to settle the bounds between Exeter and Dover, 14 April 1657 [NHPP].16,17

The town of Exeter granted one mile and a quarter square of land along the "Pascassick" River to Edward Hilton, as he recited in his sale of one half that land to Mr. William Payne of Boston, 3 October 1660.18

Edward Hilton left a will with administration being granted on 6 March 1670/71 (or 6 April 1671) to his sons Edward Hilton, William Hilton, Samuel Hilton and Charles Hilton, and they were enjoined to bring in an inventory [NHPP]. On petition of "Mrs. Katherin Hilton" it was ordered that her thirds be set out at the July 1671 court [NHPP]. The inventory of Edward Hilton was taken 9 and 10 March 1670/1 and totalled £2204;, it was brought into court on 29 June 1671, at which time a claim was made to part of the estate by Christopher Palmer on behalf of two of the administrator's sisters [NHPP]. The inventory included £1810 in real estate: "the manor and appurtenances," £600; "marsh & meadows and appurtenances," £600; "the sawmill & privileges & appurtenances," £600; and "ten acres on the south side of the brook, towards Exeter," £10. On 1 July 1671 it was ordered that "all the land, meadows & sawmills shall stand & do stand bound until the creditors be satisfied" [NHPP; NHPLR]. "Mis Katterine Hilton, executrix [sic] to Mr. Edw: Hilton deceased," sued George Norton, but withdrew the case at York court, 19 September 1671 [MPCR].

On 25 June 1672 in "answer to the petition of Xtoph[e]r Palmer & Hen[ry] Moulton who married the daughters of Mr. Edw[ard] Hilton deceased who petitioned this court that they might have children's portions with their brothers who had administration granted unto said estate," Dover and Portsmouth Court ordered "that the administrators appear & bring into the next county court & account of the estate for a right division of it" [NHPP].

On 15 January 1673/4, Edward Hilton, Samuel Hilton and Charles Hilton deeded to "Mrs. Katherine Hilton our mother-in-law" a parcel of land "sometime the land of our dear father deceased" in lieu of £80 granted her as her share of his estate [NLR].19,20,21

Child of Edward Hilton

Citations

  1. [S110] Albert H. Hind, History and Folklore of Old Washington, Brian J. Hewitson, Coxhoe, Durham, Great Britain, 1976, p. 43.
  2. [S114] New England Historical & Genealogical Register (www.NewEnglandAncestors.org), The Great Migration Begins: Immigrants to New England 1620-1633, Volumes I-III; research database on line re "Edward Hilton."
  3. [S136] NHPP: Provincial Papers, Documents and Records Relating to the Province of New Hampshire from 1686 to 1722, 40 volumes, Nathaniel Boulton, ed. (Manchester, NH, 1867-1943), 40:256.
  4. [S107] Hilton Family Information from Eric Wil Lamberton, www.AncestryUK.com, "Hilton Info," e-mails February 6 & 8, 2005 to Kerry Davis.
  5. [S110] Albert H. Hind, History and Folklore of Old Washington, Hind actually makes no mention of Edward in his book, but says, "In the following year, the second ship left this country and it carried the name of "Fortune." One of the pilgrims on board, with wife and family was William Hylton of Biddick Hall, who had held the estate and farmed the lands Biddick. Many descendants of the Hylton family are to be found in the United States, and this William Hylton was referred to, as the "Biddick Pilgrim Father," p. 43.
  6. [S115] Ancestry of Charles Stinson Pillsbury and John Sargent Pillsbury, 2 vols., by Mary Lovering Holman (Concord, 1938), p. 333.
  7. [S1] Pedigree of the Family of Hilton (Hylton), (MS, Written circa 1933 by David Manly Hilton; Damariscotta, Maine), Info taken from Ella Gregg Bean's handwritten transcript of the Hilton manuscript; Kerry S. Davis Family Files; Kentfield, Marin County, California. See first noted Hylton, Sir William de Hylton, Knight, b. circa 900, for further information on the Alternate Line starting in 900, which has many of the same people as the more proven Hilton line starting in 1146 with Romanus de Helton. Hereinafter cited as The Hilton Family Pedigree.
  8. [S125] The Mayflower by Kate Caffrey (Stein & Day, 1974), lists both William and Edward Hilton on the passenger list of the Fortune arriving 1621 with Thomas Barton, Master. They are number 19 and 20: Hilton, Mr. William (25 at least), and Hilton, Mr. Edward (25 at least), p. 356.
  9. [S173] Nathaniel Philbrick, Mayflower: A story of Courage, Community, and War (Viking, New York, 2006), p. 135.
  10. [S174] John Scales, History of Dover, New Hampshire, Volume I, Containing Historical, Genealogical and Industrial Data of its Early Settlers, Their Struggles and Triumphs (1923, Manchester, New Hampshire, John B. Clarke Co., Printers; reprint on CD-ROM Westminster, Maryland: Heritage Books, 2004), p. 310. Hereinafter cited as History of Dover, New Hampshire.
  11. [S114] New England Historical & Genealogical Register (www.NewEnglandAncestors.org), The Great Migration Begins: Immigrants to New Englan 1620-1633, Volumes I-III; research database on line re "Edward Hilton."
  12. [S114] New England Historical & Genealogical Register (www.NewEnglandAncestors.org), 24:264-69.
  13. [S136] NHPP: Provincial Papers, Documents and Records Relating to the Province of New Hampshire from 1686 to 1722, 40 volumes, Nathaniel Boulton, ed. (Manchester, NH, 1867-1943), 1:28-29; 1:157-58.
  14. [S137] Samuel F. Haven, History of Grants under the Great Council for New England, Boston, 1869, p. 32.
  15. [S136] NHPP: Provincial Papers, Documents and Records Relating to the Province of New Hampshire from 1686 to 1722, 40 volumes, Nathaniel Boulton, ed. (Manchester, NH, 1867-1943), 1:137-38.
  16. [S124] MBCR: Records of the Governor and Company of the Massachusetts Bay in New England, 1628-1686, Nathaniel B. Shurtleff, ed., 5 volumes in 6 (Boston 1853-1854), 2:5.
  17. [S136] NHPP: Provincial Papers, Documents and Records Relating to the Province of New Hampshire from 1686 to 1722, 40 volumes, Nathaniel Boulton, ed. (Manchester, NH, 1867-1943), 40:155, 164, 178, 187, 192; 40:6; 40:116-17.
  18. [S138] NLR: (Old) Norfolk County, Masachusetts, Deeds, 2:308.
  19. [S136] NHPP: Provincial Papers, Documents and Records Relating to the Province of New Hampshire from 1686 to 1722, 40 volumes, Nathaniel Boulton, ed. (Manchester, NH, 1867-1943), 31:124; 40:264; 40:269; 31:124; 40:274; 40:274.
  20. [S139] NHPLR: New Hampshire Provincial Deeds, New Hampshire Division of Records Management and Archives, Concord, New Hampshire, 1:98-102.
  21. [S127] MPCR: Province and Court Records of Maine, 6 volumes (Portland 1928-1975, Newburyport, Massachusetts, 1991), 2:435.
  22. [S114] New England Historical & Genealogical Register (www.NewEnglandAncestors.org), The Great Migration Begins: Immigrants to New Englan 1620-1633, Volumes I-III; research database on line re "Edward Hilton." According to Pillsbury Anc 335, citing an unknown source, Edwad was deposed "aged 48 years, 30 March 1677/8."

Sir James Metcalfe of Nappa Hall, Wensleydale

b. circa 1460

Great-grandfather of William Hilton.
12th great-grandfather of Kerry Suzanne Davis.
Charts
Pedigree Chart for Margaret Davis
Sir James Metcalfe of Nappa Hall, Wensleydale was born circa 1460.1 He married Margaret Pigott of Clotherham before 1515?.1 Sir James Metcalfe of Nappa Hall, Wensleydale died.

Children of Sir James Metcalfe of Nappa Hall, Wensleydale and Margaret Pigott of Clotherham

Citations

  1. [S18] "The Lineage and Ancestry of H.R.H. Prince Charles, Prince of Wales Edinburgh, 1977, by Gerald Paget, Reference: O 24954.

Sir William Hilton

b. between 1530 and 1542, d. 9 September 1600
Sir William Hilton|b. bt 1530 - 1542\nd. 9 Sep 1600|p25.htm#i244|William Hilton of Biddick|b. b 1511\nd. 1562|p18.htm#i180|Margaret Metcalfe|b. c 1515\nd. a 4 Jun 1566|p19.htm#i190|William Hilton|b. 1471\nd. a 2 Dec 1526|p19.htm#i189|Sibyl (Sybil) Lumley|b. c 1481-1488\nd. bt 1518 - 1581|p19.htm#i188|Sir James Metcalfe of Nappa Hall, Wensleydale|b. c 1460|p25.htm#i243|Margaret Pigott of Clotherham||p43.htm#i426|

15th great-grandson of William I King of England.
13th great-grandson of Romanus de Helton.
12th great-grandson of Eleanor of Aquitaine Queen of England.
Uncle of William Hilton.
10th great-granduncle of Kerry Suzanne Davis.
Sir William Hilton was born between 1530 and 1542 in Biddick, Durham, England.1 He was the son of William Hilton of Biddick and Margaret Metcalfe. Sir William Hilton married Anne York before 1578. Sir William Hilton died on 9 September 1600.2

The eldest brother of Roger Hilton of London, Sir William became Baron Hilton of Hilton Castle upon his father's death circa 1562.3

Child of Sir William Hilton and Anne York

Citations

  1. [S13] Conclusions Drawn: I am assuming he was born in Biddick, Durham like his brothers.
  2. [S18] "The Lineage and Ancestry of H.R.H. Prince Charles, Prince of Wales Edinburgh, 1977, by Gerald Paget, Reference: N 12477.
  3. [S1] Pedigree of the Family of Hilton (Hylton), (MS, Written circa 1933 by David Manly Hilton; Damariscotta, Maine), Birthdate based on this and fact that Roger was born around 1542; Kerry S. Davis Family Files; Kentfield, Marin County, California. See first noted Hylton, Sir William de Hylton, Knight, b. circa 900, for further information on the Alternate Line starting in 900, which has many of the same people as the more proven Hilton line starting in 1146 with Romanus de Helton. Hereinafter cited as The Hilton Family Pedigree.

Ann Dudley

Ann Dudley||p25.htm#i245|Rev. Samuel Dudley||p181.htm#i1803||||||||||||||||
Ann Dudley was the daughter of Rev. Samuel Dudley.1 Ann Dudley married Edward Hilton, son of Edward Hilton, before 1658.2,1

Citations

  1. [S109] "Genealogical Dictionary of Maine and New Hampshire," by Sybil Noyes, Charles Thornton Libby, and Walter Goodwin Davis, pp. 209, 332.
  2. [S114] New England Historical & Genealogical Register (www.NewEnglandAncestors.org), The Great Migration Begins: Immigrants to New England 1620-1633, Volumes I-III; research database on line re "Edward Hilton."

William Hilton

b. 1451, d. 31 May 1506
William Hilton|b. 1451\nd. 31 May 1506|p25.htm#i246|William Hilton|b. 1405\nd. 13 Oct 1457|p20.htm#i200|Mary Stapylton|d. a 1471|p21.htm#i201|Robert Hilton|b. 1385\nd. 11 Aug 1447|p26.htm#i251|Isabel||p151.htm#i1503|William Stapylton||p21.htm#i202|Margaret Vipont||p151.htm#i1506|

10th great-grandson of Romanus de Helton.
2nd great-grandfather of William Hilton.
13th great-grandfather of Kerry Suzanne Davis.
Charts
Pedigree Chart for Margaret Davis
William Hilton was born in 1451. He was the son of William Hilton and Mary Stapylton. William Hilton married Margery Bowes, daughter of Sir William Bowes and Maud Fitzhugh, before 1471. William Hilton died on 31 May 1506 at age 55 years.

William Hilton was also known as Sir William Hilton Knight & Baron of Hilton.

Child of William Hilton and Margery Bowes

Robert de Hilton

b. circa 1333, d. 1377
Robert de Hilton|b. c 1333\nd. 1377|p25.htm#i247|Alexander de Hilton|b. c 1312\nd. 1361|p21.htm#i203|Maud de Emildon||p21.htm#i204|Robert de Hilton|d. a 1323|p21.htm#i205||||Richard de Emildon||p149.htm#i1486||||

6th great-grandson of Romanus de Helton.
6th great-grandfather of William Hilton.
17th great-grandfather of Kerry Suzanne Davis.
Charts
Pedigree Chart for Margaret Davis
Robert de Hilton was born circa 1333. He was the son of Alexander de Hilton and Maud de Emildon. Robert de Hilton married Eleanor Felton, daughter of William Felton, before 1356. Robert de Hilton died in 1377.

Child of Robert de Hilton and Eleanor Felton

Eleanor Felton

Eleanor Felton||p25.htm#i248|William Felton||p149.htm#i1487||||||||||||||||

6th great-grandmother of William Hilton.
17th great-grandmother of Kerry Suzanne Davis.
Charts
Pedigree Chart for Margaret Davis
Eleanor Felton was the daughter of William Felton. Eleanor Felton married Robert de Hilton, son of Alexander de Hilton and Maud de Emildon, before 1356.

Child of Eleanor Felton and Robert de Hilton

William Hilton

b. 1356, d. 25 May 1435
William Hilton|b. 1356\nd. 25 May 1435|p25.htm#i249|Robert de Hilton|b. c 1333\nd. 1377|p25.htm#i247|Eleanor Felton||p25.htm#i248|Alexander de Hilton|b. c 1312\nd. 1361|p21.htm#i203|Maud de Emildon||p21.htm#i204|William Felton||p149.htm#i1487||||

7th great-grandson of Romanus de Helton.
5th great-grandfather of William Hilton.
16th great-grandfather of Kerry Suzanne Davis.
Charts
Pedigree Chart for Margaret Davis
William Hilton (1356-1435)
Hylton Castle built in 1400
Photo taken by Jill Draper © 2004
William Hilton was born in 1356. He was the son of Robert de Hilton and Eleanor Felton. William Hilton married Dionisia Hilton, daughter of Robert Hilton and Maude of Campaigne. They were 3rd cousins, once removed with their common ancestors being Robert de Hilton and his wife Joane Britton. I am assuming that Dionisia was William's first wife. William Hilton married Joan de Bidick before 1385. William Hilton died on 25 May 1435 at age 79 years.

At age eleven, 3 August 47 Edward III, 1367, he was heir to his mother and one of the co-heirs of Sir William Felton.

In 1377, then of full age, he was heir to his father. Also in 1377, he went with the Bishop of Norwich on crusade to Flanders.1

Between 1377 and 1435, William Hilton was also known as Knight, Baron of Hilton.1

In 1381 William pirated 2 Scots ships.1

From Froissart's account of the Battle of Otterburn: "And on the English party, before that the Lord Percy was taken and after, there fought valiantly Sir Ralph Lumley, Sir Matthew Redman, Sir Thomas Ogle, Sir Thomas Grey, Sir Thomas Helton (Hilton?), Sir Thomas Abingdon, Sir John Lilleburn, Sir William Walsingham, the Baron of Helton (Hilton?), Sir John of Colpedich, the Seneschal of York and divers other footmen." The Hilton family at this period appears to have been part of a strong alliance amongst the Knights of northen England. It's interesting to find that many of these men, as well as others, were represented by their shields or their coats of arms, which were carved into the stone front of Hylton Castle when it was built around 1400.1

In about 1400, Baron Hilton built what is the current Hylton Castle. It was built as a gatehouse style fortified manor house. Although no construction records survive, the style oif the architecture and coats of arms on the west front mean that it dates to the 1390s or first decade of the 1400s. We know that a building existed here from 1072 A.D., from local records, none of which survive. And it's clear that other buildings existed on this site at this time as the inventory taken on Sir William's death in 1435 mentions a hall, four chambers, two barns, a kitchen and the chapel, in addition to the castle. Eric Lamberton says that "the date the castle was built can be identified by the heraldry of King Henry IV at the top (the large flag above the shields), which shows the castle must have been built between 1390 and 1410. King Henry VI's arms would not have been placed on this castle building until after 1399 when he was crowned King of England. It was one of the most fascinating events in English history immortalised by Shakespeare in his Henry IV Parts I and II. King Richard II had ruled England until 1399 when he was deposed by the nobles of England and replaced by the son of John of Gaunt, a cadet branch of the Plantagenets, from the House of Lancaster based on the opposite side of the country."

Surtees' History of Durham describes the castle, as well as the shields or coats of arms carved into the stone of the castle. The Royal Coat of Arms has 3 Fleur de Lys in a form first used in the Great Seal of Henry IV 1405-6 and the Stag of Richard II is carved on the gatehouse suggesting the castle was built before Richard's deposition in 1399. The inquest on Robert Hilton below gives a description of the completed castle.

The castle is located three miles to the West of Wearmouth Bridge, on the old road to Newcastle. There is no village. The Castle stands low and sequestered (according to the exact import of the original name "Heltun"), in the vale of Wear, along the River Wear. The centre only of the present structure is ancient. The East front exhibits an oblong square tower rising above a portico of modern Gothic work. The West front has in the centre the great entrance, or gatehouse, perhaps nearly in the state in which it was reared in the reign of Richard II. The gatewav is defended by square projecting turrets, with hanging parapets, exactly resembling the coeval architecture of Lumley. Two round towers of later date connect the centre with uniform wings of completely modern architecture. The grounds to the North and East have been laid out in slopes and terraces, at the highest point of which, to the North, stands the elegant small St. Catherine's Chapel (photo courtesy of Jill Draper © 2004). The chapel, dedicated to St. Catherine, is known to have existed on the site since 1157, when it was likely that Hylton Castle was a wooden building. Nothing remains of the first chapel and the ruins seen today date from the early 15th century. The building was modified during the period from the late 15th to the late 16th century when a window and transpets were added. However, an engraving by Buck in 1728 shows that the chapel had gone out of use by that time, as it had no roof. Althrough repairs were carried out by the last Baron Hylton, and by its owners in the 19th century, the chapel also fell into disrepair and it too later became the responsibility of the State.

               

The following account of the arrangement of Arms on Hilton Castle, is as correct as the mouldered state of several of the shields would permit.

On the West front or Gatehouse :
On a banner and flag-staff: England and France quarterly. Underneath the banner: thirteen shields disposed in three rows, though somewhat irregularly, and perhaps not in their original position. Here is a photo showing the ancient shields on the wall of the castle (photo courtesy of Jill Draper © 2004).

               

1. Gules, a saltier Argent (silver) - Nevill.
2. Argent (silver), six willow wands interlaced, or in true love, Sable - Bishop Skirlaw.
3. Percy and Lovaine quarterly; these three shields are somewhat larger than the rest.
4. A Lion rampant, a label of three points: perhaps the Braband Lion alone for the heir of Percy.
5. A Lion rampant ......?
6. Quarterly, Argent (silver), two bars Azure (blue) - Hilton; and, Or (gold) six annulets Gules - Vipont.
7. Argent (silver), a fesse Gules inter three popinjays Vert (green) - Lumley.
8. A Lion within a bordure engrailed - perhaps Grey.
9. Or (gold) and Gules quarterly, over all on a bend three scallops - Eure.
10. ... a chief dancette. Ou - Fitz-Randal of Middleham.
11. Argent (silver), two bars, and three mullets in chief - Washington.
12. Argent (silver), a fesse inter three crescents Gules - Ogle.
13. ... three waterbudgets . . . Ou. Lilburne.

On the right flanking tower of the Gatehouse:
14. A Lion rampant debruised by a bend - Vescy.
15. Within a bordure two Lions passant - Felton of Edlington
16. Azure (blue), 3 herons Argent (silver) - Heron.

The North wing only is represented in Buck's stiff but accurate view (17:8). The corresponding wing was probably added by the last Baron after that date, at least the same John Hilton ultimus is said by Bourne, "to live in the place of his ancestors, which he has adorned and beautified beyond what was done in past ages," C. Bourne, p. 82, in margine.

It may be added here, that several of the turrets of Hilton are still crowned with human figures, some in grotesque attitudes, others as combatants, etc., in the usual manner; a custom, which if it were not intended for mere ornament, was perhaps practised to deceive an approaching enemy, who could hardly tell, at some distance, whether the garrison were on the alert or not. The interior of the Castle consists of five stories; the only observable apartment is a very spacious saloon on the first floor.

On the left flanking Tower:
17. Ermine, on a canton Gules an orle O (gold)r - Surtees.
18. Effaced - thought to be Lamberton
19. Ermine, three bows Gules - Bowes.

On the East front:
Within a plain shield the arms of Hilton only. Crest: on a closed helmet, Moses's head in profile, in a rich diapered mantle, the horns not in the least radiated, but exactly resembling tiao poking-sticks (this is probably one of the earliest exemplars of this sinuglar bearing. The sculpture is extremely defaced, and I am indebted to the unwearied pains and patience of Sir Cuthbert Sharpe for tracing an accurate outline). Above all, in bold relief, a stag couchant, collafed and chained.

On the Chapel:
Above the South window, Hilton quartering Vipont and Stapleton. Supporters, two stags of very rude and antique design. Over the North window, the same arms without supporters, but with the usual crest. On the West front, five shields, Hilton quartering Vipont and Stapleton; supporters two Lions, no crest; twice repeated. Hilton and Vipont quarterly; the Crest without supporters; twice repeated: and Hilton quartering Vipont and Stapleton, with the Stags for supporters.

               

And here, above, is a watercolor of the Hylton Coat of Arms or Family Crest (photo courtesy of Jill Draper © 2004). The family motto in French, "Tant que je puis," translates to "As much as I can." A description of the crest: A Moses head in profile, glorified and adorned with a rich diapered (white or linen) mantle which is sitting on a closed helmet. The top left quarter has two Azure Bars on a white background which is the Hilton arms; it also can be seen on a flag which flies above Hylton Castle today. The top right quarter appears to possibly be the Lumley arms with "Three Popinjays Vert," and arms in the lower left quarter with two Lions Passant belongs to Felton of Edlington. The lower right quarter with the three red swords on a white ground is that of Sir William Stapleton of Cumberland. The crest is supported by two Azure Lions which I gather no one was permitted to use unless descended from Royalty (Draper). The Hilton family's original grant to bear arms or the "Coat de Armour" can be found in The General Armory and Burke's Peerage (also Draper).

ERIC LAMBERTON GIVES A NICE EXPLANATION OF HERALDRY WHICH SEEMS APPROPRIATE TO INSERT HERE FOR THOSE WHO DON'T KNOW MUCH ABOUT IT.

Coats of Arms were originally designed as a way of identifying knights in armour, who without their distinctive shields and surcoats would have all looked alike on the battlefield or on the tournamount ground. Originally each knight would have probably chosen or invented his own Coat of Arms. Later the right to bear the Arms became hereditary. During the 13th Century, the appearance of a new knight at a tournament would be greeted by a Herald, sounding a trumpet. The Herald would explain the devices and symbols on the competing knight's shields and Coats of Armour to the assembled audience, and this knowledge has become known as Heraldry.

The heraldry on the front of Hylton Castle remained as a reminder to the future Kings and Queens of England of the power and importance of the Northern Knighthood to ruling England.1,2,3,4


In 1403 Baron William was outlawed in London and Eric Lamberton believes this shows that he was involved in the rebellion against King Henry IV.

As Eric tells the story, "It probably seemed a good idea at the time, but in 1403, the 1st Earl of Northumbreland led a rebellion against the newly crowned King Henry IV to take control of England north of the River Trent. Aided and abetted by the Douglas from Scotland and Owen Glendower from Wales the rebellion was defeated when Hotspur, son of the 1st Earl of Northumberland was killed and his army defeated at the battle of Shrewsbury. The Earl of Northumberland was forced to flee into Scotland," and William Hylton was outlawed in London. Eric goes on to say that "Baron William Hylton who built the castle was known as the 'old survivor.' He lived through the reign of five English kings and died in 1435 at the grand old age of 79 years of age. His effigy, somewhat the worse for wear, lies in a monumental tomb in St Peter's Church at Monkwearmouth in the City of Sunderland, England."1,5,3

William Hilton and his sons Alexander and Robert seem to have had some problems with the Monks of Wearmouth as shown in a petition and grievances brought against the Hiltons. Please click here to view the documents which look to be in perhaps Middle English with translations to current English.6,1

Children of William Hilton and Joan de Bidick

Citations

  1. [S108] "The History and Antiquities of Durham," by Robert Surtees, 1840.
  2. [S121] Personal communication between Kerry Davis and Jill Draper of St. Louis, MO (e-mail address), distant cousin and fellow Hilton descendant, Thanks to Jill for sharing photos from her recent trip to Hylton Castle, as well a bit of the Draper Genealogy, Volume I, prepared by Paul A. White (1997) which pertains to Hilton Heraldry.
  3. [S107] Hilton Family Information from Eric Wil Lamberton, www.AncestryUK.com, from "The Secrets of Hylton Castle."
  4. [S142] City of Sunderland, City Library and Arts Centre, England, Local Studies Centre Fact Sheet Number 8 "Hylton Castle & Dene," e-mail address.
  5. [S141] Descendants of Romanus de Helton, by Allan Hylton Scorer, 5 September 2000, Berkshire, England (e-mail address), Thanks to Allan Hylton Scorer and his cousin, a Latin teacher, we have an English translation of this data.
  6. [S141] Descendants of Romanus de Helton, by Allan Hylton Scorer, 5 September 2000, Berkshire, England (e-mail address).

Joan de Bidick


5th great-grandmother of William Hilton.
16th great-grandmother of Kerry Suzanne Davis.
Charts
Pedigree Chart for Margaret Davis
Joan de Bidick married William Hilton, son of Robert de Hilton and Eleanor Felton, before 1385.

Children of Joan de Bidick and William Hilton

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